Opinion: What Would A Hilary Clinton White House Mean for the ICC?

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Justice in Conflict

Mark Kersten is a researcher, consultant and teacher based in London. His research focuses on the nexus of international criminal justice and conflict resolution. Specifically, Mark’s work examines the politics of the International Criminal Court and the effects of its interventions on peace, justice and conflict processes.

Kersten maintains the Justice in Conflict blog. “Much of what is written at Justice in Conflict fits within the debate about the relationship between peace and justice. Understanding this relationship is an immensely difficult task and much of the literature and work done on the subject to date remains insufficient and unconvincing. Nevertheless, the difficulties in understanding the relationship between peace and justice is matched only by its importance.”


What Would A Hilary Clinton White House Mean for the ICC?

In this recent article, Kersten offers insights on what a Clinton administration would mean for the International Criminal Courts.

“…it is hard to imagine any significant change in the US’s piecemeal engagement with the ICC under a Hillary Clinton presidency. Clinton – or whoever the next President is – will face some stark political challenges when it comes to international criminal justice.”

Read the full article, and subscribe to Kersten’s Justice in Conflict blog here.

Justice in Conflict

(Photo: AFP) (Photo: AFP)

In an announcement that came as a surprise to exactly no one, Hillary Rodham Clinton has declared her candidacy to become the Democratic candidate in the 2016 US Presidential election. Whether it has been as First Lady, Senator for New York, or Secretary of State, Clinton’s political life has covered the most momentous contemporary developments in international criminal justice. So if she were to become the first-ever female President of the United States, what would Clinton’s tenure mean for the relationship between the ICC and the US? Would it be markedly different than what we’ve seen under Barack Obama?

Under Obama, the US has had an improved yet still mixed relationship with the ICC. The administration supported a referral of Libya and Syria to the ICC. In 2012, the State Department expanded its Rewards for Justice programme to include some individuals indicted by the Court. Even if…

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